News

News

Oct 24, 2016
Kampala, UGANDA

Globally, there are 1.1 billion economically active but low-income women.[1] What this means for digital financial service (DFS) providers is that there is a huge potential market of women DFS customers that remains largely untapped. When it comes to DFS, it turns out that what is good for women is good for everyone.

Oct 24, 2016
Kampala, UGANDA

Facilitating women’s access to digital financial services (DFS) is an opportunity for the private sector to engage in gender equality. This is how Rosa Malango, UN Resident Coordinator in Uganda, opened the latest Partner Event of the Mobile Money for the Poor (MM4P) conference #DFS4W, today in Kampala, Uganda.

Oct 24, 2016
Kampala, UGANDA

Today at the Lake Victoria Serena Hotel, near Kampala, Uganda, the UN Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) programme Mobile Money for the Poor (MM4P) kicked off its annual learning event—#DFS4Women. Providing women in Africa and Asia with better, more affordable and more useful digital financial products and services is at the heart of this conference.

Oct 21, 2016
Port Moresby, PAPUA NEW GUINEA

A new pilot partnership in Papua New Guinea (PNG) providing affordable green energy has the potential to drive the adoption and usage of financial services among rural low-income Papua New Guineans.

MiBank is working with Empawa, a local provider of solar power units in PNG to target off-grid homes to supply cheaper, more sustainable, green energy while at the same time creating access to a range of financial services through mobile phones.

Oct 17, 2016
New York, USA

The theme of this year’s International Day for the Eradication of Poverty is "Moving from humiliation and exclusion to participation: Ending poverty in all its forms". It reminds us that eradicating poverty remains one of the greatest challenges facing humanity. Globally, 767 million people live on less than $1.90 a day[1], many lacking access to adequate food, clean drinking water and sanitation. Women are more likely to live in poverty than men due to unequal access to paid work, education, and property.

Oct 17, 2016
Phnom Penh, CAMBODIA

The grant agreement between the UN Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) and Amret Microfinance Cambodia was publicly signed on the 14th of October 2016, in the presence of representatives from the UN, the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) and Amret management staff.

Oct 17, 2016
Yangon, Myanmar

A farming household managed by an older woman is typical of farming households who depend for a large part of their income on the sale of crops grown on their own land: incomes and expenditures are ‘lumpy’ compared to those of non-farming families, or of farming families who mostly labor on other people’s land.

Oct 13, 2016
Bangkok

Have you heard of the Fosbury Flop? Probably not. But you’d know one if you saw it. It’s the technique that high jumpers use when jumping back-first over high bars, commonly seen at the Olympics. It wasn’t always the accepted way of doing things, of course. Previously, athletes approached the bar front-on, and jumping over backwards was considered unconventional and clumsy. The consensus at the time was that jumping backwards could never lead to higher jumps. That was until Dick Fosbury came along and won gold, employing his namesake move at the 1968 Olympics.

Oct 13, 2016
Phnom Penh

As a growing number of solar companies offer the pay-as-you-go (PAYGO) financing model for customers, the solar sector is going digital. Not only are customers paying digitally, but solar companies are building digital back offices.  With support from several partners, including UNCDF CleanStart, Kamworks – a solar company that provides solar power to more than 150,000 rural customers in Cambodia – has developed a proprietary PAYGO and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) platform.

Oct 11, 2016
Dakar, SENEGAL

Some 78 percent of the 200 million young people in sub-Saharan Africa live on less than $2 a day and only 5 percent have access to financial services. With statistics like these, there is no question that youth have become a core concern in many African economies – yet most financial institutions are not equipped to address them as real potential customers. Lack of access to financial resources is a major constraint for youth transitioning from school to work.

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